Tag Archives: Red Hat

Red Hat links Java to Visual Studio

Red Hat links Java to Visual Studio

Oh this is a big deal just too bad Visual Studio is non Windows otherwise I would gladly use it

http://www.infoworld.com/article/3122362/java/red-hat-links-java-to-microsofts-visual-studio-code.html

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Build 12 PCs with Red Hat Virtualization

Build 12 PCs with Red Hat Virtualization

This Linux distro is becoming the standard it seems for HFT trading solutions

How to build 12 PC’s 5 Secs RHEV Redhat Virtualization Rack Server

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Is CentOS Linux compatible with Red Hat 7

Is CentOS Linux compatible with Red Hat 7

After one oft the largest HFT operators in India sent me their tech list, they are using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 which sort of confirms my theory of what Linux distribution to go with. But the questions comes up:

Is CentOS Linux still compatible with RHEL 7

Let me know via Facebook

http://www.eweek.com/enterprise-apps/slideshows/centos-7-comes-on-the-heels-of-red-hat-enterprise-linux-7.html

http://www.infoworld.com/article/2608433/linux/red-hat-stamps-its-influence-on-centos-7.html

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Did you know Goldman Sachs were the early adopters of Red Hat Enterprise Linux? RHEL

Did you know Goldman Sachs were the early adopters of Red Hat Enterprise Linux? RHEL

I knew this a long time ago but Goldman Sachs were the ones who put Red Hat on the map.

http://www.goldmansachs.com/our_firm/investor_relations/financial_reports/annual_reports/1999/html/clients/innovation/red-hat.html

http://www.cnet.com/news/red-hat-jboss-growing-twice-as-fast-as-linux/

http://seekingalpha.com/article/1190401-red-hat-inc-presents-at-goldman-sachs-technology-and-internet-conference-2013-febminus-12minus-2013-03-20-pm?page=2&p=qanda&l=last

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Meet my RHEL CentOS Linux Oracle VirtualBox Market Feed Big Data Virtual Machine for all open source C++HFT including FIX

Meet my RHEL CentOS Linux Oracle VirtualBox Market Feed Big Data Virtual Machine for all open source C++HFT including FIX

This will get exciting. I need a new VM for all latest C++ libraries, Redis, and so much more. Watch me where this goes!

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Youtube video demo on how to install Hadoop with Cloudera CDH3 fast in CentOS Red Hat 6 Linux

Youtube video demo on how to install Hadoop with Cloudera CDH3 fast in CentOS Red Hat 6 Linux

Learn how to install it via Cloudera at:

https://ccp.cloudera.com/display/CDHDOC/Installing+CDH3+on+a+Single+Linux+Node+in+Pseudo-distributed+Mode

learn more how I proceed with this at:

http://quantlabs.net/membership.htm

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The great Oracle Linux vs Red Hat Enterprice Linux RHEL Debate. Who has better support and who is more open?

The great Oracle Linux vs Red Hat Enterprice Linux RHEL Debate. Who has better support and who is more open?

 

I found this very funny but who do you believe or who do you believe is better?

 

This came from Red Hat Enterprise Linux Newsletter Email group;

 
>> It is less evil. And going to Oracle Linux means dealing with Oracle
>> support… or, lack thereof, and utterly uncoordinated support, for very
>> small values of “support”.
>>
>> It took me a *month* to get a box fixed, and that included two weeks
>> emailing with an engineer in Chile, and three separate managers “taking
>> ownership” of the issue….
>
> I also know someone who has good experience with Oracle.
>
> Even the free support on the Oracle Forums (at:
https://forums.oracle.com/forums/forum.jspa?forumID=822 ) is good —
> so far I’ve posted 3 questions, and 3 of them were answered by the
> Oracle employees within a week.

Um, right. Meanwhile, this box was under warranty, and had hardware
issues. And when I complained that the engineer in Chile was being pulled
off to respond to other issues, and so sometimes I’d get several emails a
day, other times, I’d email results of tests, and it would take him 2-3
days to get back to me, I got a new engineer… WHO ONLY WORKED NIGHTS.

As a comparison, I had a similar problem with a Dell box, and there was an
FE out within two weeks, *and* one manager had “taken ownership”, *and*
when I had a problem a couple months later with another box, that same
manager contacted me. My manager and co-worker have had similar, though
not quite as extreme, experiences with Oracle, and we have *no* intention
of buying Sun/Oracle ever again.

—-
Oracle linux has been pretty much blacklisted by red hat. That’s why a
number of changes were done to how red hat pushes out kernel patches;
specifically to stymy their efforts. Also, having an issue responded
to within a week is horrid, especially in an enterprise environment.
Usually when I am having an issue, I need a resolution FAST.

Don’t drink the oracle koolaid. Copy your /home directory and any
customized files from /etc to a safe place, and then reinstall RHEL.
The support is worth every cent.

( Hmm, now it becomes an Oracle Linux discussion… which is not what
I originally intended. 😛 )

So tell me how Redhat is less evil — isn’t opensource supposed to be
no vendor lockin? So if Redhat is doing this, then customers are
locked into RHEL.

A lot of people say that Oracle does not have deep knowledge in Linux,
as Oracle Linux is just a clone of RHEL — however, Oracle internally
uses Oracle Linux for most its software development. I don’t think a
typical environment is much more complex than the ones inside Oracle
(Oracle Linux is used to develop Oracle Database, Fusion Middleware,
Oracle Grid Engine, E-Business Suite and other Oracle Applications on
Oracle Linux — according to Oracle). Oracle develops its own
enhancements for Oracle Linux as well, not to mention Oracle’s own
kernel. I don’t believe Oracle engineers calling Redhat support for
technical issues.

And Oracle was able to roll out Oracle Linux 6 a week or 2 after RHEL
6 release, while the wait for CentOS 6 was months long.

I know that many people hate Oracle, but simply saying that Oracle
Linux does not work / not as good / not worth the $ is not fair to
Oracle (or any others, as we know that Redhat wrote around 10% of the
patches in the kernel, 90% of the code was developed by IBM, Intel,
AMD, and even Oracle — eg. BtrFS, OCFS). Oracle enhances Linux and
uses Linux for Exadata and ExaLogic.

>>>> It is less evil. And going to Oracle Linux means dealing with Oracle
>>>> support… or, lack thereof, and utterly uncoordinated support, for very
>>>> small values of “support”.
>>>>
>>>> It took me a *month* to get a box fixed, and that included two weeks
>>>> emailing with an engineer in Chile, and three separate managers “taking
>>>> ownership” of the issue….
>>>
>>> I also know someone who has good experience with Oracle.
>>>
>>> Even the free support on the Oracle Forums (at:
>>> https://forums.oracle.com/forums/forum.jspa?forumID=822 ) is good —
>>> so far I’ve posted 3 questions, and 3 of them were answered by the
>>> Oracle employees within a week.
>>
>> Um, right. Meanwhile, this box was under warranty, and had hardware
>> issues. And when I complained that the engineer in Chile was being pulled
>> off to respond to other issues, and so sometimes I’d get several emails a
>> day, other times, I’d email results of tests, and it would take him 2-3
>> days to get back to me, I got a new engineer… WHO ONLY WORKED NIGHTS.
>>
>> As a comparison, I had a similar problem with a Dell box, and there was an
>> FE out within two weeks, *and* one manager had “taken ownership”, *and*
>> when I had a problem a couple months later with another box, that same
>> manager contacted me. My manager and co-worker have had similar, though
>> not quite as extreme, experiences with Oracle, and we have *no* intention
>> of buying Sun/Oracle ever again.
>>

—–>

You’d be surprised actually. Oracle itself has admitted to patching
the kernel with certain performance tweaks dedicated exclusively for
their products; however they haven’t submitted the changes to the
mainstream kernel development. So, essentially they’re taking the
kernel, tweaking it, and not giving back to the community. Now under
GPL, they don’t have to release their code, but it still leaves a sour
note in a lot of peoples’ mouths. Especially because one of their
touted selling points is that “they clean up red hat’s problems.”

Not to mention they’ve only certified the tweaks for Oracle software.
That means they could cause your other mission critical application to
crash every 2 seconds, but so long as your database is running oracle
will give it a stamp of approval.

Also, they have stripped out a number of open source solutions in
order to include their own proprietary solutions (so yes, vendor
lockin). They have removed GFS/GFS2 and replaced it with their
proprietary competitor OCFS2. They have removed redhat cluster suite
and replaced it with the closed source oracle clusterware.

If any these things break, who can help you? Oracle.
If you’re using RHEL, anyone who uses RHEL, Cent, or SL can probably help you.
I don’t want to turn this into a distro war – Oracle linux is made for
running oracle databases. That’s it, and it’s very good at doing that.
However pretty much every other case you’re going to be better covered
by RHEL or its derivatives.

Also, Oracle/Sun support sucks. Compare experiences with Red Hat to
experiences with Oracle, there is a pretty stark contrast. Red hat was
first and foremost a company to provide support for otherwise free
software. Oracle on the other hand is just a money making machine.

I don’t care which one people use really, I use cent and SI for my own
work, and RHEL for production boxes. I still have yet to see a good
reason to use oracle.

—–

> You’d be surprised actually. Oracle itself has admitted to patching
> the kernel with certain performance tweaks dedicated exclusively for
> their products; however they haven’t submitted the changes to the
> mainstream kernel development.

Not correct — according to lwn.net, for the past few releases, Oracle
did contribute to the latest Linux kernels by sending patches to Linus
& the LKML.

> Not to mention they’ve only certified the tweaks for Oracle software.
> That means they could cause your other mission critical application to
> crash every 2 seconds, but so long as your database is running oracle
> will give it a stamp of approval.

Oracle ships 3 kernels with Oracle Linux:

1) 100% compatible RHEL kernel (ie. a rebuild from the same source)
2) RHEL compatible kernel with bug fixes done by Oracle
3) Oracle Unbreakable kernel

So if the application really crashes due to Oracle;s changes, use the
older but 100% compatible RHEL kernel.

There are over 7000 paying customers using Oracle Linux, and I don’t
believe Oracle would put changes in that is designed to crash other
applications.

In fact, software products that are competing with Oracle are built on
Oracle Linux, for example the Open Grid Scheduler, and Univa Grid
Engine (another fork of Sun Grid Engine). I am sure others might use
Oracle Linux, but I am more of an HPC guy.

See the example on this page, even the low level hardware interaction
code does work on Oracle Linux:
http://gridscheduler.sourceforge.net/projects/hwloc/GridEnginehwloc.html

> Also, they have stripped out a number of open source solutions in
> order to include their own proprietary solutions (so yes, vendor
> lockin). They have removed GFS/GFS2 and replaced it with their
> proprietary competitor OCFS2. They have removed redhat cluster suite
> and replaced it with the closed source oracle clusterware.

OCFS2 is open source AFAIK:

http://oss.oracle.com/projects/ocfs2/

> If any these things break, who can help you? Oracle.
> If you’re using RHEL, anyone who uses RHEL, Cent, or SL can probably help you.

In the end, in the user space, Oracle Linux, RHEL, CentOS, and SL are
mostly idential.

> I don’t want to turn this into a distro war

Same here 😀

> – Oracle linux is made for running oracle databases. That’s it, and it’s very good at doing that.

Oracle software developers use Oracle Linux for software development –
and Oracle does not only has DB products, it also has middleware,
cloud computing software, embedded software (Berkeley DB for example),
and Java!

So, can one really writes a kernel that runs all of the software that
Oracle has, but only crashes or slows down one inhouse application?

> Also, Oracle/Sun support sucks. Compare experiences with Red Hat to
> experiences with Oracle, there is a pretty stark contrast. Red hat was
> first and foremost a company to provide support for otherwise free
> software. Oracle on the other hand is just a money making machine.

If only the first who enters the market can do business, then we will
have a very different world then we have today. 😀

And how is Redhat not a money making machine? RHT is close to making
$1B in the next FY (FY2012?). And Redhat charges more money than
Oracle for support.

> I don’t care which one people use really, I use cent and SI for my own
> work, and RHEL for production boxes. I still have yet to see a good
> reason to use oracle.

I use Oracle Linux for my development & build machines, and the thing
that is good is that with Oracle Linux one can become a paying user
without reinstalling.

 

 

 

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Are quant prop shop trading companies using CentOS, Red Hat, or Ubuntu Linux for production trading systems?

Are quant prop shop trading companies using CentOS, Red Hat, or Ubuntu Linux for production  trading systems?

Here is a profile of a trading firm using Ubuntu server. With the latest release, are many prop shops choosing this Linux version for the reasons listed below. Let me know your thoughts. We find it a toss up between CentOS and Ubuntu for our deployment solutions. My question is which one is more secure?

Chicago-based financial services company chooses Ubuntu and cuts server infrastructure by 70 per cent

Financial services company Equitec was running its mission-critical, proprietary trading software on 100 Windows-based servers. After experiencing a series of performance issues, the company decided to upgrade to Ubuntu 8.04 LTS. Now Equitec can run its entire workload on just 30 Ubuntu-based servers, which equates to a dramatic hardware, space and power saving of 70 per cent for the same performance. Additionally, Equitec has experienced significant reduction in systems management overheads, running its critical common workloads and its trading system with a minimum of fuss, outage or maintenance. The company is seeing a very real reduction in the total cost of ownership (TCO) of its IT infrastructure through switching its servers to Ubuntu.

Business challenge

Financial services companies must ensure that their business-critical processes run without interruption. With real money at stake, completing and recording trade agreements is central to their success. Equitec Group, LLC needs to run its transaction and pricing activities around the clock. The company must be confident that its IT infrastructure can support its day-to-day processes, while running as efficiently as possible.

Equitec found that its existing Windows-based server infrastructure was not delivering the efficiency that the business demanded. Igor Chudov, Senior Software Developer, Equitec, says: “At a certain point, we started to have performance problems with the network that seemed to be Windows-related.”

The company’s IT team was responsible for maintaining and managing 100 servers in all. This was becoming a time-consuming process that needed an IT administrator to perform frequent manual system upgrades.

Chudov says: “We were working hard on cost of ownership and we didn’t want to spend too much time managing and installing each server. Nor did we want to have to keep installing each server from a custom CD. We wanted all those things to manage themselves.”

Chudov decided to introduce new software that could simplify the scripting of server management and installation tasks. He wanted to ensure that all the scripts could be viewed and managed from a central console. Equitec also wanted the new infrastructure to work seamlessly with the proprietary

trading software on which the business runs. It also needed to be compatible with the HP ProLiant machines that the company primarily used, along with the Dell servers on which they ran some functions.

At the same time, the company needed to ensure that its traders could continue to use their familiar Windows desktops. With a tight budget and aims to reduce the TCO of its infrastructure, Equitec decided to use common tools and software so that the improved IT experience did not come at a premium.

The Ubuntu Server solution

Chudov was sure that he wanted to move the servers to a Linux platform, which he’d been working with for years. After evaluating the options, he rejected Red Hat Fedora and decided to introduce Ubuntu. He explains: “I found that the Ubuntu platform was a lot easier to automate.”

The Red Hat Package Manager (RPM) manager process did not make the grade. Chudov says: “There were a lot of circular dependencies. You had to be a genius to figure out what to install first. I didn’t want to mess around with something like that.”

Nearly all of the Equitec servers now run either the long-term support (LTS) version of Ubuntu Server Edition, Ubuntu 8.04, or Ubuntu 8.10. As a result, upgrades and system tweaks are all managed by scripts.

In addition to the Windows-to-Ubuntu upgrade, Equitec has moved its database from Sybase on Windows to the MySQL version that comes with Ubuntu. The database is backed up daily and continually replicated. Each backup involved around 100 megabytes of data.

Equitec completed 90 per cent of the project in just four months. The traders kept their familiar Windows desktop and tools, while half of the company’s software development team runs Ubuntu, and half run Windows.

Results

Ubuntu server infrastructure improves performance

The company’s proprietary software continues to operate as before, but without the network latencies that helped spark the migration in the first place. Now, Ubuntu runs the common workloads – such as email and file and print – that keep Equitec running without interruption.

Centralised infrastructure simplifies management and saves time

With a central console for its server management tasks, Ubuntu eases systems maintenance and ensures that IT administrators can spend more time on business-critical activities.

Chudov says: “When someone wants to set up an extra function, they can do that from a central console.” They can write scripts to run batch-mode functions and can avoid physically transferring data from server to server.

Efficiency boost delivers potential hardware savings of 70 per cent

As Ubuntu requires less processing power than Windows to perform the same tasks, the company has seen a dramatic improvement in the efficiency of its server infrastructure. As a result, it has reduced the number of physical servers it needs to perform its business-critical tasks by 70 per cent.

Chudov says: “We had about 100 servers in use and now 30 are running the workload. We’re trying to find use for the remaining 70. I’m optimistic we’ll find something for them although it’s obviously better to have 30 than 100.”

http://www.ubuntu.com/products/casestudies/equitec-financial-services-chooses-ubuntu-server

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For quants, what is the fastest Linux flavour Ubuntu, Red Hat, Solaris, Centos?

For quants, what is the fastest Linux flavour Ubuntu, Red Hat, Solaris, Centos?

So I started this conversation on Linked In:
What is the fastest Linux or Unix flavour?
What is the fastest Linux or Unix flavour?
Everyone talks about Linux and Unix in generic terms. Has anyone ever done any metrics to find which performs best or is the fastest for their applications? How would the newer Ubuntu compare to something like Red Hat? Where does CentOS or Debian come into play? How does Solaris versus Open Solaris measure up? We are trying to decide which flavour is best for our application. It is both written in Java and C++.
——
The distributions have different methods for delivering packages (RPM’s .Deb’s, etc). As for the speed, you’ll definitely want the server variant as the desktop variant includes a lot of background processes to run the desktop GUI. I’ve tried 5+ variants and for business, I’d probably go with Red Hat since you can purchase very high level of support and the packages are rather easy to manage. I rather like ubuntu, but you’d have to run a few test to get a better metric. You shouldn’t have a problem running Java or C++ since libraries and compilers exist for all the variants. I feel your hardware and ram/swap space would play a bigger role in computing performance. Something I ask everyone is this… If you can get 5% improvement for a 25% cost increase, is that worth it to you? It all boils down to what system you’re comfortable managing.

——-
This is what I thought. Do you find there is a huge difference between Red Hat and CentOS in terms of compatibility and performance? Anyone know the difference in terms of metrics of Red Hat environments, Ubuntu Server, and commercial Solaris. I wonder if anyone is actually using a Ubuntu Server in a production environment.`
——-
• Each problem is different but here is my educated guess in order of likely performance/dollar spent. If you are just doing this to learn Linux or your time is really cheap this list does not apply.
1. The biggest performance benefit would be making the problem parallel and running it on multiple machines. I did this once for a large neural network training, 100 computers basically accelerated the problem 100 fold (hard to get anywhere near that with any other optimization). This was the luxury of doing this at an academic institution with shared computational resources (UofM).
2. Make sure your algorithm is efficient. I’ve seen embarrassingly poor database implementations that slow things down an order of magnitude. Likewise, sometimes the forward problem is hideously expensive and the reverse cheap or the other way. There are also fun cheats, a many point moving average can be approximated with a infinite response filter (at much cheaper computational costs). Language can have a significant impact as well.
3. Upgrade the machine you are using. If it is all computational then optimize your CPU, if it is largely database optimize RAM and disk throughput.
4. Select a fast file system. Looks like ext4 might be the choice (http://blogs.computerworld.com/15413/the_best_linux_file_system_of_all ) though I have not used it yet.
5. Select which processes you run to maximize performance. Be careful though what you throw out today you may need tomorrow. I would only spend a lot of time on this if you really want to learn Linux or if your time is pretty inexpensive.
6. Benchmark distros. A nice summary of distros can be found herehttp://distrowatch.com/ (no performance info). Searches for best, fastest, etc get similar info.

I used Red Hat all through grad school, and liked it a lot. I run Ubuntu now, but its casual and I have not done any performance optimizations

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How do I choose Microsoft .Net technologies like C++ or C# versus Red Hat Linux or Solaris Unix platforms for my Java or C++ quant development?

How do I choose Microsoft .Net technologies like C++ or C# versus Red Hat Linux or Solaris Unix platforms for my Java or C++ quant development?
As I mentioned in a previous post as being part of these influential Linked In groups, there was a very interesting one which was the most popular operating system and C++ compilers out there in the world of quant. I have already discussed my views of Linux versus Microsoft Windows. For those that don’t know, I would go with Linux based version if you need latency to near zero. Windows technology might not cut it.
As part of the C++ compiler question, why was there a resounding popularity for Windows based compilers like Visual Studio and Microsoft related programming languages like C++ or C#? I mean, once you support these languages, it is safe to say you will become a fully Microsoft shop. As I have consulted with numerous investment banks and even researched a bunch, it seems larger banks like Morgan Stanley, Citi, or whoever use a hybrid approach. It sounds like many of CIti’s derivative trading platforms are deployed on Microsoft Windows servers while other departments like their Risk maybe deployed on a Linux or Unix based platform like Solaris. I mean it gets kind of confusing for those starting out in Quant development.
I think one suggestion for those go into this career is to choose a better cross platform language like Java or C++. Also, if you go with a C++ technology, ensure the frameworks (or libraries) you choose are cross platform as well. This is one reason why I like Java backed web frameworks like Google Web Toolkit as they are cross platform and browser independent. You obviously do not get that with Microsoft .Net based technologies which of course include C ++ or C#. As I said, choose well based on these technologies and programming languages for your early quant development days.

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